Terri's Airy Fairie World

Musings on Music, Tea, Gardening, Food & Life…


1 Comment

Last Night’s Dinner…

My blog has sort of gotten pushed to the side over the last few weeks, due to other priorities, like updating my website (which I’m still working on), so in an effort to share Something, here are the details of last night’s dinner!

First of all, I’m a long time fan of Nom Nom Paleo’s Cracklin’ Chicken recipe. I don’t really like chicken very much. It’s not very satisfying for me, and I usually get hungry pretty quickly after eating it. I do like chicken stock though, and will occasionally make chicken salad, but most of the time if I cook chicken, I prefer chicken thighs. They are fattier, and  more satisfying. This recipe has been my favorite way to enjoy chicken for awhile now, very versatile, and really, just perfect. If you haven’t tried it yet, you owe it to yourself to do so, & I think you’ll agree. Here’s the Cracklin Chicken recipe, & I’d like to thank Michelle for her blog, books, and ipad app! So many wonderful recipes! I’ve been a fan for years now. Thank you!

The other day I picked up some thighs, planning to make that recipe, but I’ve been super busy, and it does take a certain amount of prep time, in that you have to remove the bones. Gratefully Michelle shared a new chicken recipe a few days ago, an asian inspired variation on Cracklin Chicken, Cantonese Crispy Chicken Thighs! One of my family members has a Shroom phobia, so I left out the Shiitake Mushrooms (reluctantly), and due to the extreme heat in St. Louis, all of my cilantro is gone (until more comes up), but I have plenty of shallots, garlic, and scallions from my garden, so that was close enough! The chicken is crispy and wonderful, the pan juices rich & satisfying. Thank you Michelle for another wonderful recipe!  In a minute I’m going to eat the leftovers for lunch. Here’s the link.

img_3394I originally planned to serve this chicken over cauli fried rice, but then I realized I was out of cauliflower.

Improvisation is what I do, and so I made a simple cabbage sauté instead.

img_3395

Simple Cabbage Saute

Cut a cabbage in half, core and thinly slice half of it. Put the rest in the frig for next time.

Heat some good fat in your skillet, slice up 3 or 4 slices of bacon. Saute until crispy, then remove from the skillet.

Add the cabbage to the skillet, stir it around to coat with fat, cover and cook, stirring frequently,  until it starts getting tender. Remove lid, toss in some grated ginger & minced garlic and continue stirring, allowing excess moisture to evaporate.  If you’re out of fresh garlic & Ginger, you can use powdered, although it won’t be nearly as good.

Toss in a handful of Scallions (I use Egyptian Walking Onions), and season with fish sauce and toasted sesame oil to taste. Sprinkle the bacon over the top and enjoy!

img_3392

 

 


1 Comment

My Offal Lunch, 7/20/16

First, I haven’t posted in awhile, for a variety of reasons, mostly just life in general, but Life is Good, and always better than the Alternative! So here I am, it’s mid-summer now, and although I haven’t really stuck with my plans for this blog entirely, I’m always willing to try to get back on track (in every area of my life). Every day is a new adventure!

I’ve been planning on doing a series called My Offal Lunch (pronounced Aweful, but not  necessarily tasting so) for awhile, so today is the first offering!! Why Offal, you ask?

  • Because that stuff is really good for us, but many of us tend to go into an avoidance pattern with liver, heart, and other such things. I’m no different, and this is an opportunity for me to share my experiences, and encouragement.
  • Because I have a bunch of these things in my freezer, and they are taking up space!
  • Because many of us don’t know what to do with this stuff, so again, I’ll be sharing  my ideas.

Today  is just as good of a day to start as any other, right?

French Lamb’s Heart & Veggie Soup

This soup isn’t really French, but I used herbs from my garden that might be considered French, so I figured Why not? As with all of my recipes, it is free of gluten, dairy, nightshades, and various other inflammatory things, and many of the ingredients came directly from my Garden.

IMG_3295

Step one: Slice up a few shallots, and by a few, I mean as many as you like! I went with 3, but I wished I’d gone with 5 or more. Heat a little fat in a sauce pan (I used bacon fat leftover from breakfast), add the shallots, and sauté until nicely caramelized.  This step isn’t necessary, but does add a richer flavor. You could also substitute an onion, a leek, or any kind of oniony things. Once they are to your liking, add some broth. Any broth will do, although beef broth would be especially flavorful in this case, and of course homemade broth is the best! I freeze my broths in pint sized containers for making soup. I also freeze them in 1 cup containers and ice cube trays, because you never know when you’ll want some broth, but not necessarily a pint! Anyway, if your broth is frozen, bring it up to a simmer.

IMG_3286

Step two: While your broth is heating up (or, more smartly, before you’ve even started cooking), prep some veggies. I wanted spiralized noodles, but didn’t feel like hauling out the spiralizer, so instead I opted for using the veggie peeler. I used a carrot, a red turnip, and a golden turnip. BTW, the red turnip is much milder than the golden one, also, because of the extreme heat lately, that golden turnip never got very big, and was a little pithy. The nice thing about using the veggie peeler to make your noodles is you can peel off strips until you get to the pithy center! So this is great for any root veggies that have a tough center, but still have some use! Other possible veggie choices for this soup would include parsnips, parsley or celery root, rutabega, radishes, beets (golden would be especially nice), squash, and really any veggies that you can spiralize or make ribbons out of. Not in the mood to spiralize? No problem, just slice things up into bite size pieces. Or if you have some leftover spagetti squash, use it.

IMG_3285

I also thawed and chopped up a lambs heart. It was actually frozen when I started the broth, so I put it in a tub of hot water to thaw for about 10 minutes, and then removed the tough looking parts, which is easier to do if the heart is still a little frozen. I added those scraps to my freezer container of bones for next week’s broth making. and sliced the heart into smaller chunks. Heat a little bacon fat in a skillet, saute the heart a little and set aside. Good news, I ate a piece and it actually tasted good! Kind of like sirloin steak, only a little stronger, but nothing like liver, just in case you were wondering.

Step Three: Once the broth is simmering, stir in the veggies and let them cook until tender to your liking. At this point I also started sampling the broth and adding salt to taste. I was initially thinking I would go with Asian flavorings, but ended up adding a few sprigs of French Thyme, a small amount of Lovage, and a little pepper.

IMG_3291

Finally, I stirred in the heart, a sprinkle of dill, a large pressed garlic clove, and a little Red Boat, because you can never have enough umami! I also considered adding some greens, but I ate a  pile of them for breakfast. I let it simmer a few more minutes, and then enjoyed a savory satisfying lunch!

IMG_3296

Using My Fitness Pal, I estimate the calories to be somewhere in the 500 – 600 range. Here’s the Macros:

IMG_3297

And below you’ll see the estimated nutrients, although I had to do 2 overlapping screen shots to get it all.

Thanks for stopping by, and feel free to leave a comment, including any experiences you’ve had with Lamb’s Heart! Enjoy the day!


4 Comments

Hello Spring!

My garden is waking up, and I want to spend every waking moment out there! Here are a few pics I took on Wednesday!

While I was out there I started the process of digging up leeks, separating the clumps, and replanting them so they can get fat & juicy!  I grow 3 different varieties of Leeks. These are King Richard, and I still need to deal with the Giant Musselburgh and Bleu de Solaise. Then it will be on to the Shallots & other oniony things.IMG_2929

One of my favorite breakfasts in the Springtime is Eggdrop soup. It’s not pretty to look at, but it is delicious and nutritious, and super easy to make. For each serving you’ll need:

1 C of broth (chicken, pork, beef, or whatever kind you have on hand)

grated ginger & garlic to taste (or you can go with other seasonings)

Fish sauce or coconut aminos or salt to taste

Oniony things – Leeks, shallots, onion, chives, spring onions… today I used leeks. If you want to deepen the flavor, sauté the onions first.

A Handful of Greens – today I went with Dandelion, yesterday it was Kale. Any edible greens will work!

1 egg, beaten with a pinch of salt or a few drops of fish sauce

Get everything ready…

Heat your broth with all of the ingredients except the greens and the eggs. Let it simmer briefly, until it is infused with the ginger & garlic.

IMG_2932

Sample it and when you like the way it tastes, drop the greens in there, stir, and then slowly add the eggs, gently swirling just a little as you go. Remove from heat and enjoy!

Optional additions: tiny pieces of leftover meats, spiralized veggies, Shallots that have been sautéed until crispy, crumpled bacon…

Before additions, here are the estimated Macros, according to myfitnesspal.com

 Carbs 9% (2G), Fat 58% (7G), Protein 33% (10G)

And of course it’s rich in vitamins, minerals, collagen, and other good things!

IMG_2934